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Issue 13 – November 2020

LATEST UPDATE

 
Kia ora
Welcome to the latest pānui for the BOP Health COVID-19 Response for the Bay of Plenty and Lakes Regions.  Included in this issue:
  • Te Arawa Trials Covid Card
  • Port of Tauranga Testing Q&A
  • Christmas Parties:  Responsible hosting through COVID-19
  • Protect Whānau from Legionnaires Disease
  • Measles: Immunisation is FREE and Easy 
Feel free to circulate among your own databases.  If you or anyone you know would like to subscribe, please click here

COVID-19 Latest Statistics

WESTERN BOP ACTIVE CASES: 0
HISTORICAL CASES: 47  RECOVERED CASES: 47

EASTERN BOP ACTIVE CASES: 0
HISTORICAL CASES: 1  RECOVERED CASES: 1

ROTORUA ACTIVE CASES: 0
HISTORICAL CASES: 10  RECOVERED CASES: 10

TAUPŌ ACTIVE CASES: 0
HISTORICAL CASES: 6  RECOVERED CASES: 6

CONFIRMED & PROBABLE CASES NZ-WIDE: 2001
TOTAL CASES RECOVERED: 1918

*Figures correct as at 16th November 2020

Te Arawa Trials Covid Card 

New Zealand’s response to tackling COVID-19 reached another key milestone on Thursday 29 October with the launch of the “on-the-ground” phase of a community-based trial of a COVID contact tracing card in Ngongotahā, a suburb of Rotorua.

The on-the-ground phase was officially launched by Minister for Government Digital Services, Hon. Kris Faafoi and Te Arawa COVID Response hub kaumatua Sir Toby Curtis and Monty Morrison.
Between 500 and 1500 people are being sought to participate for the trial which will involve them wearing the card for a week and providing their feedback on the experience. Participants will need to be over 19 years old and live and/or work in Ngongotahā.

Co-designed by Te Arawa COVID Hub, the Ministry of Health and the Universities of Otago and Waikato, the trial’s purpose is to understand how a contact tracing card works in a real-world scenario, whether it is compatible with New Zealand’s contact tracing systems, and if people will accept and use them.
“On behalf of Government, I acknowledge the commitment of the Ngongotahā community and local leaders to deliver this trial,” says Minister Faafoi.
Read More
Examples of the community-based COVID contact tracing card trial in Ngongotahā, co-designed by Te Arawa COVID Hub, the Ministry of Health and the Universities of Otago and Waikato.

Port of Tauranga Testing Q&A

The following Q & A's respond to a number of commonly-asked questions relating to implementation of the requirements at the Port of Tauranga under the COVID-19 Public Health Response (Required Testing) Order 2020 and the COVID-19 Public Health Response (Maritime Border) Order (No. 2) 2020.
Why is there testing at the Port of Tauranga?
We are currently testing those who work at the border, including those who work at ports and at Managed Isolation and Quarantine Facilities. This is part of the government’s rapid response to the current outbreak, to help detect any cases and to protect workers, their families, whānau and communities.

Is everyone required to be tested? 
Workers in certain higher-risk occupations at the Ports of Auckland, the Port of Tauranga and Auckland International Airport will be tested once every 14 days
 
Who is considered high risk? 
Higher risk workers are:
  • ​​Pilots and stevedores carrying out work on or around ships
  • Anyone who has boarded a ship at Port of Tauranga or Ports of Auckland since 21 July (eg ships’ agents or welfare workers)
  • Anyone else who has been at Port of Tauranga or Ports of Auckland who has symptoms.
Read More

Christmas Parties:  How to be a COVID-19 Responsible Host 

It's that time of the year, and if you've been charged with organising the Christmas wind up, you've probably already thought about your host responsibilities around safe alcohol consumption.   But have you thought about keeping your Christmas event COVID-19 safe? Here are some tips to help you ensure your Christmas event remans a merry one. 

1.  Display & Use QR codes

People are encouraged to keep a record of where they’ve been to support any future contact tracing if required. This includes when people attend gatherings.

All businesses and services, unless exempt, are required to display the official NZ COVID Tracer QR code posters in a prominent place at or near the main entrances to each of their premises. Further information on contact tracing requirements for business is available from the business.govt.nz website.

Read more about the NZ COVID Tracer app.
 

2.  Encourage & Practice Good Hygiene

Attendees should have access to appropriate hand washing facilities with soap and water, and the ability to dry their hands thoroughly. Organisers should provide an alcohol-based hand sanitiser.

Using an appropriate cleaning solution, keep communal areas such as bathrooms and high-touch surfaces like door handles and payment machines clean.

Read more about general cleaning during the COVID-19 response


3.  Stay Home 

Avoid attending a gathering of any size if you are:

  • unwell
  • a confirmed or probable case of COVID-19
  • waiting for a COVID-19 test result
  • self-isolating – read more about self-isolation
  • At high risk of COVID-19 infection

4.  Wear a Mask
At Alert Level 1, it is not mandatory wear a mask although it is encouraged on public transport.  Why not make being safe fun and encourage your guests to wear a fun festive face covering.  Follow the link to find out how to make your own face mask.

Protect Whānau from Legionnaires' Disease

With this warmer weather ☀️  it's a popular time to get in the garden and plant yummy veggies. It’s also important to keep yourself safe from a potentially serious illness – Legionnaires' disease.
Compost and potting mix often contain the bacteria which causes Legionnaires’ disease, which can occur when the dust is inhaled. Gardeners can take simple steps to reduce the risk of infection, such as using compost and potting mix in ventilated spaces, opening the bag away from your face and by cutting rather than ripping it, watering gardens using low pressure, wearing a tight-fitting mask, and washing your hands well after gardening.

Measles: Immunisation is
FREE and Easy

Measles is a serious disease that can make you very sick. It’s about 8 times more contagious than COVID-19, so it spreads fast. Getting immunised is the best way to protect you, your whānau and community from catching and spreading measles. PROTECT YOURSELF AGAINST MEASLES – IT’S EASY AND FREE

Say yes if a health professional offers you a free measles immunisation. You can ask your GP for a measles immunisation. It’s free. You can also get a free immunisation at some pharmacies if you’re 16 or older. Check if your local pharmacy offers the measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) immunisation. If it does, you can just turn up. You don’t need an appointment. The pharmacist will take you to a private space in the pharmacy to do this.
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