Copy

In England SUMMER is here and in Forest Row we are enjoying the best the rural countryside has to offer with long walks through the Ashdown Forest on warm, balmy, late evenings, under vast blue skies. The long grasses are tapered in extraordinary colours and the meadows dappled with buttercups and daisies….  and we can all breathe out!  We have even experienced some sensational electric storms with roaring thunder and torrential rain. 

Summer is an outward expression, so we are out and about offering a number of opportunities for you to explore the numerous gifts that Ayurveda and Yoga have to offer:

This Saturday 9th June Dr. Vijay Murthy will be sharing his ‘Ayurvedic Perspective on Optimum Nutrition’ enabling you to understand your ‘unique constitution’ and how to modify your personalised nutrition to achieve your specific health goals…. more

On Saturday 16th June Sari and Oli from ‘Five Elements’ in Cornwall are hosting Kriya to share how the application of Ayurvedic principles and Yoga can be beneficial during the transition through menopause…. more

On the 28th July, Dr. Vijay Murthy will be back in Forest Row to share his ‘Ayurvedic Perspective on Cancer Prevention and Management’.  This will be an inspiring and personally significant talk as this summer marks three years since Kriya’s son Mikhail was undergoing treatment for ‘Hodgkins Lymphoma’, supported by Dr. Vijay ... more  

The Midsummer Solstice is less than a fortnight away so our yoga classes are dedicated to exploring variations of ‘Surya Namaskar’ the most celebrated of all yoga sequences.  Wherever you find yourself on the Summer Equinox on June 21st roll out your mat and join with hundreds of thousands of yogis around the planet by practising ‘Surya Namaskar’ to celebrate ‘International Yoga Day’.  Nourish yourself by aligning your practise with an intention in accordance with this years theme: 
‘Yoga for Harmony and Peace’.
 
If you are local to Forest Row join us at IKHAYA to greet the dawn with ‘Mantra Chanting’ from 04.00 and our annual marathon of 144 rounds of ‘Surya Namaskar’  followed by a shared breakfast feast.  Or at 20.00 join us to honour the setting sun with the sacred fire ritual ‘Havan’ to cleanse the body, mind and atmosphere, to awaken auspicious energies to invoke blessings and grace into our lives.    



Ayurveda offers a system of quality, cost effective and sustainable healthcare to those willing to take personal responsibility for their health. Through simple self-managing and regulating tools we are empowered to implement healthy strategies to support longevity.  All the above events are rooted in this philosophy:
WE hold the KEYS to our OWN health. 

So with the outward expression of SUMMER take time to reflect on YOUR routine with reference to the article below, as this is key to your wellbeing.


Transforming Menopause with Ayurveda and Yoga:


16th June 2018

09.30 - 17.00 

Five Elements, Silverwell, Saint Agnes, Cornwall TR48JE

Book this workshop

An Ayurvedic Perspective to:


Optimum Nutrition

9th June 2018

10.00 - 12.30 

Ikhaya, Forest Row, RH18 5HP
 

Book this workshop

Diabetes prevention and maintenance

15th September 2018

10.00 - 12.30 

Ikhaya, Forest Row, RH18 5HP

 

Book this workshop


Transforming Menopause with Ayurveda and Yoga:


13th October 2018

10.00 - 17.00 

Satyananda Yoga Centre, 70 Thurleigh Road, London SW128UD

Book this workshop

An Ayurvedic Perspective to:


Cancer prevention and maintenance

28th July 2018

10.00 - 12.30 

Ikhaya, Forest Row, RH18 5HP
 

Book this workshop

Chronic Fatigue prevention and maintenance

3rd November 2018

10.00 - 12.30 

Ikhaya, Forest Row, RH18 5HP

 

Book this workshop

Dinacharya
Living beings strive for health, for without health there is no life.  Homeostasis is a physiological concept describing how the body adjusts to maintain relatively stable internal conditions whilst the outside world continuously changes.  Ayurveda or ‘knowledge of life’ has evolved from practical, philosophical and spiritual illumination, rooted in understanding the Cosmos.  Ayurveda is the ART of daily living in relation to environmental change.

Pancamahabhutas and Doshas
Ayurveda postulates that understanding an individual’s unique body, mind and consciousness is the foundation of health. The individual body is regarded as a microcosm of the macrocosm, the Cosmos.  A fundamental principle of Ayurveda is to understand the elemental building blocks of the microcosm known as pancamahabhutas (panca – five; maha – great, bhutas – elements).   The microcosmic body systems are made up from the essence of matter: recycled earth, water and air together with space, the medium; and fire, the energy that animates matter.  This constitutes the five great elements.  These elements combine in unique constitutions to create the three doshas.
Earth and water create kapha dosha(K); water and fire - pitta dosha (P); and
air and space - vata dosha (V).
The doshas describe different body constitutions defined by their gunas (qualities) listed below:

Kapha - K is heavy, slow, cold, oily, liquid, smooth, dense, soft, static, sticky, hard, sweet and salty. 
Pitta - P is hot, rough, sharp, light, oily, liquid, mobile, sour, pungent and bitter.
Vata - V is dry, light, cold, rough, subtle, mobile, clear and astringent.   

Prakruti and Vikruti
Optimum health is a harmonious
tri-doshic state.  To maintain health the body rhythms and systems have to balance with the rhythms of nature.  Dis-ease is the result of unbalanced rhythms.  So when one or more dosha moves out of balance it results in a K, P or V constitution determined by the prominent dosha. 
Our ‘unique constitution’ (prakruti) is determined at conception of which there are seven:   
         V, P, K, K-P, V-K, P-V, and K-P-V. 
Vikruti determines the current state of the doshas as a result of lifestyle, environmental, age and emotional factors.  Most individuals live in a vikruti state as the body continually adjusts to regain prakruti.  This striving to maintain balance is homeostasis.  Cyclical rhythms maintain balance in the universe and similarly in our own physiologies.  These rhythms include the 24 hour circadian rhythm of day and night; the monthly lunar rhythm, the annual seasonal rhythm, and the seasons of our lives. 

Natural rhythms
Lifestyle is a considered choice.  Whether health enhancing, maintaining or destroying, each individual controls their own lifestyle.  Ayurveda develops routines to prevent disease, to promote health and transform the body, mind and consciousness to higher levels.  Best practise includes considered choices including responsibilities, time availability, practicality and above all joyful presence of mind.  Routines aligned with nature’s rhythms balance the doshas.  Regulating our biological clock enables digestion, absorption and assimilation; which in turn generate discipline, self esteem, contentment and longevity.

 

Dinacharya (following a daily routine) builds a solid foundation for a healthy lifestyle.  The ‘Doshic Clock’ divides the day into 6 parts with each dosha being prominent twice in every 24 hours: 

Kapha  06.00 – 10.00
Pitta  10.00 – 14.00
Vata 14.00 – 18.00
and repeated.

The doshic clock aligns with body rhythms to enable different organs to function effectively e.g. early morning – intestine; morning – lungs; midday - stomach, afternoon – liver, late afternoon – colon and kidneys.  Doshas affect our daily routines including waking time, elimination, personal hygiene, exercise, study, work, relaxation, meditation and sleep.  As our prakruti (unique constitution) governs our waking time, you might consider how your routine relates to the 24 hour doshic clock?

Waking time is best followed by a
tri-doshic morning routine to set you up for your day.  In our SPRING NEWSLETTER we explored this routine with a morning affirmation, warm lemon water, tongue scraping, oil pulling, oil massage (abhyanga), nasal oil application (nasya), personal hygiene, yoga, pranayama and meditation.

Diet
Alongside routine diet is KEY.  Meals should be regular and prepared in line with doshic principals.  Foods are classified according to the five elements (pancamahabhutas) and categorised as aggravating or pacifying the doshas.  Another fundamental principle is ‘like increases like’.  A V-type shouldn't follow a V aggravating diet of cold, raw food; and a P-type cannot afford to eat spicy food and use alcohol and coffee stimulants.  Food combining is important, as is the quality and amount consumed.  Bad eating habits douse the flames of agni (digestive fire) which further contributes to imbalance.  Locally sourced, seasonal, organic food ensures variety aligned with the recommended daily allowances (RDA) for proteins, carbohydrates, fats, vitamins and minerals.  Prakruti balancing diets develop the dhatus (tissues) which are the fundamental building blocks of the body.

Yoga and Meditation
Work should be balanced with relaxation. Relentless emotional, physical, and psychological stress weakens the immune system and promotes unchecked inflammation.  Find time in your day to pause, connect with yourself and find space in the present moment.  Focus on your breath to let go of stress and worry and spend time in nature. Meditation, being a powerful tool for managing mental imbalances, is essential in dinacharya.  Like physical imbalances, mental disorders are prevalent.  Increased V manifests as fear, anxiety and grief; ↑ P manifests as anger, competitiveness and criticism; and ↑ K manifests as greed, possessiveness and complacency.  Meditation charges the subtle channels of the body (srotamsi) moving prana (vital force) around the body, kindling tejas (fire) to produce ojas which is the pure essence of the dhatus (tissues).  Prana, tejas and ojas have similar gunas (qualities) to V, P and K respectively.  Simply by watching the play of the doshas can develop awareness, connecting the individual to the universal mind, developing a sattva (pure) state of being.  

Evening Routine
Once established in a morning routine, develop an evening routine to prepare yourself for restful restorative sleep.  Turn off all electronic devices at least 45 minutes before bedtime.  Use the time to prepare a warm drink with soothing herbs, attend to your personal hygiene, include a foot massage, listen to yoga nidra, engage in restful or spiritual reading, write a gratitude journal, reflect and close the day with meditation.  

Next time we will expand on dinacharya and explore how this relates to seasonal variance ritucharya….

....and enjoy your expansive SUMMER!

 

Ayurveda is the ART of daily living in relation to environmental change.


 
Facebook
Instagram
Website
Email






This email was sent to <<Email Address>>
why did I get this?    unsubscribe from this list    update subscription preferences
Kriya Ayurveda · Ikhaya · Priory Road · Forest Row, East Sussex RH185HP · United Kingdom

Email Marketing Powered by Mailchimp