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The Political Education Newsletter

July 31, 2019

Published on our Blog

How to Walk Out
Boston DSA comrade and a key organizer of the Wayfair walkout Maddie H provides strategy tips on organizing the workplace, especially for white collar and tech workers.

Articles from the Web

The Curious Case of the Missing Public in Dept of Public Utilities’ Hearings: A Reportback
Boston DSA comrades from the energy democracy campaign #TakeBackTheGrid recount their experience at the Dept. of Public Utilities' hearings on National Grid’s proposed rate hikes, and highlight accessibility issues and the virtual lack of public participation at these hearings.

The Democratic Socialist Cul-de-sac: A Critical Look at the Socialist Manifesto
Doug Enaa Greene provides a balanced critique of Bhaskar Sunkara’s Socialist Manifesto, and concludes that while Sunkara espouses an innovative take on social democracy, the narrative and logic is that of old reformism.

I Was A Fast Food Worker. Let Me Tell You About Burnout.
Emily Guendelsberger details the horrific effects of chronic stress and uncertainty upon service workers increasingly micromanaged by algorithms and pressured into ever-higher productivity by understaffing.

A Podcast to Listen to

Season of the Bitch
Episode 92: Restorative Justice and Education

Music teacher Mel and high school teacher for autistic students Scarlett join Season of the Bitch to discuss flaws in the U.S. educational system and how to pave a path towards restorative justice.

Worst Take of the Week

Cometh the Hour, Cometh the Man: A Profile of Boris Johnson
As some comrades may know, right wing dunce Boris Johnson was recently elected Prime Minister of the UK. In honor of this event, British commentator Toby Young decided to drop this sparkling profile of the new PM. Toby goes out of his way to accentuate how much of a perfect specimen of a man Boris apparently is, going so far as referring to Boris as an ubermensch: this piece is quite a wild ride.

Some Subversive Literature

The Right to Be Lazy
In 1880, Karl Marx's son-in-law Paul Lafargue was in exile in London, assisted by Friedrich Engels. Though he was separated physically from the French workers’ movement, he continued to communicate with socialists there and helped them from afar. It was during this time that he wrote The Right to be Lazy, an essay critiquing attitudes and dogma around work from across the political spectrum.

     

About the PEWG Newsletter

The Newsletter is produced by the Political Education Editorial Committee. We welcome submissions of interesting articles using this form. If you'd like to join the committee please email boston-pewg@googlegroups.com.

     

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